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Malc Prentice

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Access to affordable healthcare is something that most people living in Japan take for granted. However not everyone around the world can say the same, and many people with curable and preventable diseases are not treated. This essay will first look at why access to healthcare is important, then will use the example of the Philippines as a case study to illustrate the issues, focusing on the problems lack of access to healthcare can cause, and some possible solutions.

Why is Access to Healthcare Important?

This section looks at why access to healthcare is important. Access to healthcare means that all of people have chances to get the medical services which are provided by medical profession such as doctors, nurses, and midwife ("National Healthcare Quality Report, 2011," 2014, October). In addition, access to healthcare also means that there are enough medical facilities and drug stores near the residents. In 1951, WHO defined what the health is: "Health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity", (WHO, n.d.). One reason healthcare is important is that it is a human right, since according to WHO, "It is the fundamental human right for every people to receive the highest attainable standard of health without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition" (WHO, n.d.). However, another reason that healthcare is important is that healthier countries have stronger economies ("Health and Population," n.d.). It is difficult to prove clearly which happened first – poverty or poor health - however access to healthcare is an important element for people trying to escape from poverty ("Key Facts: Poverty and Poor Health," n.d.). As such, the next section uses the example of the Philippines as a case study to explore this issue in detail, looking in particular at problems lack of healthcare can cause, and some possible solutions to those problems.

Case Study: Access to Healthcare in the Phillipines

This section first describes the Philippines in general, and then looks at some problems lack of healthcare has caused there, and some possible solutions to those problems. This paragraph describes healthcare in the Philippines in general. The Philippines is an Asian country with 7,107 islands (GOVPH, n.d.). This country was chosen because it is a rapidly developing country, and because the author is visiting it next year. There are some differences in the healthcare systems of the Philippines and Japan. While in the Phillipines, inspection and treatment facilities are often in different places ("Filipin no iryoujijyou", 2012), Japanese hospitals tend to have eveyrthing integrated in one building, including pharmacy. SECOND DETAIL MISSING. The next paragraph looks at some problems the situation described above has caused for lack of access to healthcare.

This paragraph describes problems experienced by people in the Philippines. There are three main problems - lack of medical treatment, population concentration, and double liability. The first problem is lack of medical treatment. Cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes accounted for 45 percent of total deaths in 2014 (WHO, 2014). These diseases can cure by modern medical technology however they are becoming a main cause of death in the Philippines. The main reason is that a lot of people cannot pay the doctor's bills and medicines because it is too expensive for them ("The cost of medical care in the Philippines," n.d.). For example, kidney diseases are the seventh biggest cause of death in the Philippines ("The cost of medical care in the Philippines," n.d.). The treatment which is called dialysis costs over 40,000 pesos per month ("The cost of medical care in the Philippines," n.d.). It means that the family faces financial problems when people get the medical treatment. The second problem is population concentration. The people who live in Metro Manila and Metro Cebu have much better health services than the poor who live in rural area ("Health and Population," n.d). This is partly because of higher income (Philippine Statistics Authority, 2013, December 26) and partly because there are more medical facilities in urban areas (Ishida & Nakajima, 1985, March). As such, people in rurl areas haev trouble getting treatment. The third problem is double liability. The poor have to borrow money from someone to receive health services. However a lot of doctors only think about their profit and then they recommend unnecessary supplements at a high price (Teshigawara, 2012). In addition, people have to pay transportation expenses because there is not enough medical support near their house (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, 2015, April 1). These situation is known as "double liability" and poor people suffer from debt in exchange for healthcare. For the reasons descied above, the situation of healthcare in the Phillipines needs improvement. The next paragraph looks at possible solutions to these issues.

PULL SOLUTIONS FROM OTHER ESSAY.

Conclusion

In conclusion, this essay first looked at why access to healthcare is important, then used the example of the Philippines as a case study to illustrate the issues, focusing on the problems lack of access to healthcare can cause, and some possible solutions. Healthcare is important because it linked to not only people's condition but also economic condition. There are three main problems - lack of medical treatment, population concentration, and double liability – and because of these problems, a lot of people are suffering in the Philippines. There are three possible solutions – UPDATE – however none of them are effective now. From this case study in the Philippines, government should take an important role to improve access to healthcare in developing country. Students who want to help should PULL FROM OTHER ESSAY

References

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html#D025

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